1 - Don't plan ahead

Don't fall into the trap of writing down your goals and objectives, or even worse, handcuffing yourself to specific times when you're supposed to feel obligated to do them. Instead, respond to things as they come up. Put off big projects until you have large chunks of uninterrupted time to accomplish them, or when you feel inspired. Then try to complete the task with one herculean effort.

2 - Go it alone

If you need to have someone checking up on you, it's a sure sign of your incompetence and lack of self-control. Independent-minded people make the most progress when they bypass the team and do their own thing. Accountability is overrated.

3 - Aim low

Only arrogant people set lofty goals. Those who dream big often end up flat on their face. At the end of the day, it's much better to aim for mediocrity and reach your goal rather than trying to do something extraordinary, and becoming frustrated when you can't quite accomplish it. Better safe than sorry. Those who risk the most never experience the security of living in the status quo.

4 - Point out the mistakes of others

People need to be aware of their failures or they'll never be able to change. So, keep an eye out for others' missteps or mishaps and then leak the word to the rest of your employees or volunteers. Be specific and stern. Don't give the person a chance to explain his actions since that's usually just a way of denial or shirking responsibility. It's even more beneficial to make the shortcomings of others public, so that other people in the organization can keep them in line.

5 - Mentally relive old failures

If you lost a job or got a demotion or didn't get the position you were vying for, brood over it. Dwelling on past mistakes, unresolved conflict, ...

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Ambition  |  Commitment  |  Failure  |  Goals  |  Self-examination  |  Transparency
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