Faith and trust are not synonymous, although in some aspects they may be.

We trust in God because we believe he is faithful. We have confidence in him because we believe he is able to do that which he has promised.

We have confidence in him because of who he is and what he has revealed about himself in word and action.

We depend on him because we believe he is wholly dependable.

One fine distinction that may exist between faith and trust is that which is found between action based on faith and the object of faith itself.

The writer to the Hebrews describes faith as follows: “Now faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not seen” (Heb. 11:1). “Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen” (RSV); “Now faith means putting our full confidence in the things we hope for, it means being certain of things we cannot see” (Phillips); “But faith forms a solid ground for what is hoped for, a conviction of unseen realities” (Berkeley); “Now faith is the title-deed to things hoped for; the putting to proof of things not seen” (Weymouth); “Now faith means we are confident of what we hope for, convinced of what we do not see” (Moffatt).

From these and other translations we get a clear view of the meaning of faith. Therefore, in a very real sense trust is putting faith into practice. The antithesis of faith based on the revelation of God is its rejection in favor of human reason.

We have before us a letter inveighing against both the integrity and authority of the Bible. In it the writer says: “Our judgment on these things we must make for ourselves, and there is no finality, no authority, to which we have recourse other than an honest appraisal of our own experience, and knowledge ...

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