More and more, even in places where least expected, signs are appearing with the announcement, “Open on Sundays.” To such an extent has the traditional Sabbath been exploited and commercialized that stores which still remain closed on Sundays are finding it necessary to display signs informing the public of this.

The secularization of the Sabbath day is cause for nation-wide alarm. The competitive operation of taverns, theaters, and commercialized amusements on the Lord’s Day has long been a problem to the spiritual forces of our country. And now we are witnessing a vast acceleration of this encroachment on the part of chain groceries and a variety of other stores, besides automobile agencies, real estate operation, and other enterprises, which previously have been at least neutral in the struggle to preserve the soul of our nation.

Sabbath observance is the center of gravity for the spiritual and moral life of a nation. A Sabbath-observing people, coming regularly under the illumination, stimulation, and discipline of the Word of God, give God a chance to do his best for them, in them, and through them. Such a people develop convictions and maintain standards of purity and godliness not otherwise to be attained. That which undermines Sabbath observance undermines the spiritual convictions and the moral behavior of a people.

It is in the Lord’s house, on the Lord’s day, with the Lord’s people, that a man is most likely to see himself as he is and to hear the call of God to higher ground. Thus bad men often become good, and good men become better. Unfortunately, the person who does not observe the Sabbath is generally leaving undone just about everything else that is expected of a Christian, ...

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