They brought young children to him, that he should touch them: and his disciples rebuked those that brought them. But when Jesus saw it, he was much displeased, and said unto them, Suffer the little children to come unto me, and forbid them not: for of such is the kingdom of God. Verily I say unto you, Whosoever shall not receive the kingdom of God as a little child, he shall not enter therein. And he took them up in his arms, put his hands upon them, and blessed them” (Mark 10:13–16).

“Too young,” thought the disciples. “They can’t understand, so keep them away.” But Jesus took this opportunity to demonstrate to millions of yet unborn people that God wants the children. There is no age limit in his invitation, “Come unto me.…” The promise, “I am the door: by me if any man enter in, he shall be saved,” is not fenced in to those of an “important age,” any more than to those of an “important position in life.” In fact, just as the rich and powerful have a harder time putting aside hindrances to coming to the Lord, so those who proudly feel they have reached an age that is worthy of more respect have a harder time putting aside their dogmatic presuppositions and fixed intellectual positions to listen with eagerness and expectation to the Word of God.

What is a little child like? All the ones I have known ask questions. And a child often uses the answer to his question as the base for a further question. A child wants to make progress in finding out things, and is excited about discoveries.

“He spake unto the children of Israel, saying, When your children shall ask their fathers in time to come, saying. What mean these stones? Then ye shall let your children know, saying, Israel came over this Jordan on dry land. For the LORD your ...

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