AN INTERVIEW

Question. How has your life changed since you discovered the Total Woman principles? First you put them into practice yourself. Then you began to share them with others in the Total Woman program. And then the book skyrocketed the thing.

Answer. I’m a very home-oriented person. I mean, I’m a wife and mother first and foremost, and I am determined to keep my priorities in order to meet the needs of my family and myself. This career that has now been thrust upon me requires a lot of time, but it’s last on my priority list. So I work a lot harder.

Q. Do you limit the number of weeks you’re out traveling and giving lectures?

A. I don’t travel very much. Last year I went on a seventeen-city promotional campaign for Pocket Books, and I’ll never do that again! It’s just too much time away from home. So now I teach my classes twice a year, two days at a time, for a total of four days away from home. I also have teachers who are out teaching Total Woman classes.

‘My career as president of Total Woman is last on my list of priorities. First and foremost I am a wife and mother.’

Q. Your husband is your business manager and the vice-president of Total Woman, Incorporated. Does this contradict what your book is saying?

A. In what way?

Q. Because you stress the wife’s home orientation and the husband’s headship. Normally a business manager works under the person for whom he or she is working.

A. Charlie and I are a team, and he definitely is my leader. He’s my husband and he’s the head of the family. But I never did say that women shouldn’t go out to work. It’s my personal conviction that a woman should not work if she has little children, because I think they need their mommy right there at home, and I really feel that being a home ...

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