CHRISTIANITY TODAY/November 17, 1989

Despite the growing popularity of the rescue movement, some have serious concerns about its biblical basis.

Most of those who have of late become active in the “rescue movement” look to the Binghamton, New York-based Operation Rescue (OR) for guidance. Since the organization began in 1987, over 35,000 have been arrested and an additional 16,000 have risked arrest under the Operation Rescue banner, according to OR’s figures, for blocking the entrances to facilities that perform abortions.

The rescue movement is broader than Operation Rescue. And it is a movement that shows no signs of slacking off. In addition to coordinating rescues in and around the nation’s capital, the purpose of OR’s Washington D.C. Project, which is scheduled for November 16 through 18, is to instruct constituents on how to work politically to bring an end to legal abortion. OR leaders view political action and rescuing as complementary.

Several influential Christian leaders, including James Dobson, Jerry Falwell, Charles Colson, and D. James Kennedy, have endorsed the movement with varying degrees of enthusiasm and points of qualification.

The rescue movement is not without critics. But according to Ken Myers, editor of the publication Genesis, opponents of Operation Rescue are hesitant to express their views, partly out of concern that the mass media will exploit divisions in the prolife movement to the advantage of the movement’s opponents. “Unfortunately, the rescue movement is where the action is right now,” said Myers. “And the social dynamics of a movement are such that people feel a need to express solidarity with it, even if it’s something they don’t like.”

Nevertheless, Myers maintains, “I don’t think people ...

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