I cringe a little whenever I hear a sideline reporter interview an athlete after a crushing loss—which happened a lot during the Olympics. When the heavy favorite underperformed or simply didn't medal, the reporter asked questions like this, in an attempt to get the athlete to say something worthy of Sports Center:

"You came in as the favorite tonight but seemed to struggle all night. What happened?"

The athlete, trying to be gracious (and avoid a frustrated response), usually responded quickly before cutting the conversation short.

Similarly, in the wake of tragedies like Hurricane Sandy, we watch news media assemble in devastated areas, trying to tell the victims' stories to a watching nation. We see the weeping grandmother trying to recover what's left of her home with a microphone in her face. While the reporters presumably mean well, they don't always give people the space needed when their world is falling apart.

I once heard someone say that she refrained from asking her infertile friends how they were doing because of a bad experience with trying to reach out. After genuinely trying to show support, but was met with a standoffish response when her friend was struggling with her inability to get pregnant. That scared her from asking another hurting person how he or she was doing. She just didn't want to be the reason for someone else's pain.

Trying to serve suffering people can be daunting. What if they aren't doing well that day? What if we bring up the pain just when they are ready to move on? These are all legitimate concerns. And because we often feel so badly for the one suffering, we feel pressured to not cause any more unnecessary pain.

We've all faced a barrage of comments from well-meaning friends. And while ...

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