Jump directly to the Content

Who’s More Spiritual: Emergent or Traditional Evangelicals?

Okay, so no one's had the chutzpah to frame the question so baldly. But each group seems to assume the answer in its favor–at least, that's the impression you'd get from some emergent critiques of traditional evangelicals and from some traditional-evangelical critiques of emergents. But what if we asked the question directly, and tried to answer it just as directly: Who is more spiritually mature? On the whole, are emergent believers or traditional evangelicals more faithful in their following of Christ?

To answer, we need a clear standard for measuring Christian spirituality. The best one is given by Jesus (Mark 12:29-31), but presumably both emergents and traditionals have already read that and used that for their critiques of the other. Could we find a standard of Christian spirituality that encompasses Jesus' teaching yet offers fresh points of differentiation? We might consider the four "nonnegotiable essentials" of Christian spirituality laid out by Ronald Rolheiser in The Holy Longing: ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe to Christianity Today magazine. Subscribers have full digital access to CT Pastors articles.

May/June
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Homepage Subscription Panel

Read These Next

Related
The Multitasking Trap
The Multitasking Trap
Multitasking actually kills leadership.
From the Magazine
Our Pulpits Are Full of Empty Preachers
Our Pulpits Are Full of Empty Preachers
Tens of thousands of pastors want to quit but haven’t. What has that done to them?
Editor's Pick
How the Early Church Dealt with Racial and Cultural Division
How the Early Church Dealt with Racial and Cultural Division
They saw that their ability to truly be the church was at stake.
close