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Restoring Fallen Pastors

The road back to ministry after a moral lapse—whether physical or virtua—is long and difficult. How can the restoration process be improved?

For Russ it's a little slice of heaven—a small church in a stagnant, rust-bucket town, landlocked, with a cramped creaky building, perennial money woes, and trust issues, and with no staff other than himself.

It's nothing like his last church, Woodland—the plum assignment in his region—a thriving suburban congregation near a bustling urban center, with several paid staff, gifted leaders, superior musicians, and strong sense of its mission. And, to his family's delight, good schools, loving friends, and a really nice parsonage.

This church has little of that. But for Russ, it's heaven—because he almost lost everything. Russ got hooked on internet pornography. Russ's addiction led to an emotional attachment outside his marriage and eventually a physical encounter. That's when he confessed to his wife and his denominational supervisor.

And life, as he knew it and loved it, ended.

Russ is not the only pastor whose story goes like this. No one knows how many of the 19,200 pastors ...

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