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Ahem, Your Ecclesiology Is Showing

We pastors can struggle to live up to our own cause.
Ahem, Your Ecclesiology Is Showing

What do the following have in common? (And the answer, "They are all frequently seen in the American church" does not count.)

A. A new church is launching in town, and they mail oversized postcards that read something like this: "Finally—a church where the sermons aren't boring. Where you can come as you are …"
B. We preach a sermon in which we argue, "It's not religion but relationship," or make the point, "Some Christians may have let you down, but Jesus isn't like that."
C. We say to ourselves, especially on adrenaline-depleted Mondays, If things get really hard here, I can take my gifts elsewhere.

What's in common?

In each case, the needs of the individual are being elevated above the needs of the church. Sometimes it's the individual person above the local congregation (B & C), sometimes it's the individual congregation above the wider church (A), but the individual has gotten too big, and the church too small. ...

July/August
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