Tired of stories about Lieberman, faith, and politics yet?

If not, there are still reams of articles and columns being published every day on the subject. As Chicago Tribune religion columnist Steve Kloehn says in today's paper, "Despite the tanker cars of ink devoted in the last week to Joe Lieberman's Jewishness, the political experts are having a hard time making much of it. In the end, the race between Al Gore and George W. Bush will not turn on Lieberman's faith. But religion watchers are having a field day." Kloehn's article is a fine roundup of what's being said about Lieberman's faith from the perspective of mainline Protestants ("That's nice"), evangelicals ("Yippee!"), Louis Farrakhan (does anyone really ever understand what he says?), orthodox Muslims ("uh-oh"), and Jews (you name it, it's been said). But there are a few comments Kloehn misses. Almost every media commentator in the last few days has suggested that the Democrats are getting away with a lot more God-talk than a Republican ever could. "God is back in, as if you haven't noticed," writes Tribune showcase columnist John Kass in a cynical dispatch from the Democratic Convention. "If you're a Democratic candidate, it's now OK to publicly mention God's name 20,000 times an hour. And it's fine to reflect on the relationship between faith and public policy, as long as it's just talk and you still take Hollywood's money." The Tribune's Kathleen Parker harshly condemns a perceived double standard: "Were a devout Christian wearing a fish symbol on his lapel added to the Republican ticket, Democrats and pundits would sponsor a national fish-fry. Put a devout Jew wearing a kipah (skullcap) on the Democratic ticket and suddenly menorahs are on back-order. … ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

November
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Tags:
Christianity Today
The Race for Priest-ident Continues
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

August 2000

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.