His better-known sayings—like "Anything worth doing is worth doing badly"—hint at why philosopher and essayist G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936) was considered a master of irony and paradox. This reputation was accompanied, however, by its own irony. "Critics were almost entirely complimentary to what they were pleased to call my brilliant paradoxes," he once said, "until they discovered that I really meant what I said." He became a formidable defender of classic Christianity, virtue, and decency, especially in Orthodoxy (1908).

The soul does not die by sin but by impenitence.
—The Resurrection of Rome

The greatest act of faith that a man can perform is the act that we perform every night. We abandon our identity, we turn our soul and body into chaos and old night. We uncreate ourselves as if at the end of the world: for all practical purposes, we become dead men, in the sure and certain hope of a glorious resurrection.
—Lunacy and Letters

In the majority of sane human lives there is no problem of sex at all; there is no problem of marriage at all; there is no problem of temperament at all; for all these problems are dwarfed and rendered ridiculous by the standing problem of being a moderately honest man and paying the butcher.
—A Handful of Authors

It may be a good thing to forget and forgive, but it is altogether too easy a trick to forget and be forgiven.
—The Crimes of England

The true way to overcome evil in class distinctions is not to denounce them as revolutionists denounce them but to ignore them as children ignore them.
—The Man Who Was Thursday

If I get drunk I shall forget dignity, but if I keep sober, I may still desire drink. Virtue has the heavy burden of knowledge; sin has often something of the levity of sinlessness.—The ...

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Christianity Today
Paradoxical Ortrhodoxy
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September 4, 2000

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