Like her television show, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, actress Sarah Michelle Gellar's personal spirituality borrows from a hodgepodge of religions. "I consider myself a spiritual person," she told Scotland's Daily Record. "I believe in an idea of God, although it's my own personal ideal. I find most religions interesting, and I've been to every kind of denomination: Catholic, Christian, Jewish, Buddhist. I've taken bits from everything and customized it." But Gellar also did her homework, telling Rolling Stone that she read through the Bible in 1999. Two actors reportedly have become Christians while working on the show, but its emphasis on witchcraft and other issues have kept it at the top of many Christians' "Must Flee TV" lists.


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Gellar told Scotland's Daily Record: "I consider myself a spiritual person. I believe in an idea of God, although it's my own personal ideal."

UPN has an official site for Buffy the Vampire Slayer. More interviews with Gellar are available at the unofficial Simply SMG site.

Focus on the Family's Plugged In says, "Sadly, the actual spiritual battle between darkness and light never gets a second thought. Buffy's creators are preoccupied with using the occult to banish the occult—not true good versus evil."

Last winter, Breakpoint columnist Roberto Rivera wrote that Angel, a spin-off of Buffy, is "probably television's most 'graceful' hour."

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July 8, 2002

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