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Evangelical Christian opposition to the brutal dictatorship in North Korea appears to have reached critical mass. Exhibit A is the passage of the North Korea Human Rights Act in October (see "Nightmares and Miracles," p. 29). The act raises the profile of human rights in all negotiations with the dictatorship and strengthens humanitarian assistance as well.

Michael Horowitz, senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, said a church-based coalition, working with politicians and several Jewish groups, made an "extraordinary difference in moving matters forward." At a critical juncture, a coalition led by the National Association of Evangelicals sent a letter to key Democratic Party leaders—including Joseph Biden, Tom Daschle, and John Kerry—urging Senate passage.

"There was a readiness on the part of evangelical groups to go to churches throughout critical [voting] states showing films of gulags and gas chambers," Horowitz said. "You'd better be sure that that played a role in the ultimate willingness of members of the Senate to negotiate."

Horowitz lauded the Korean Church Coalition, which held its inaugural conference during the last week of September, while the Senate debated the bill. The KCC released a statement on Christian responsibility in the crisis, with sections addressed to governments, the people of North Korea, and churches in South Korea. The KCC also held a 40-day prayer vigil before the conference. Acting director Philip Song said the KCC has a volunteer director in each of its 77 regions. So far, about 1,700 of the 2,000 member churches are in California.

Related Elsewhere:

Stan Guthrie interviewed Michael Horowitz following the passage of the bill.

Weblog also commented on the bill.

The North Korean Human ...

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Deconstructing Gulags
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December 2004

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