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Mark Driscoll was, in many eyes, immortalized in Donald Miller's book Blue Like Jazz as Mark the Cussing Pastor. As pastor of Mars Hill Church in Seattle, Driscoll is a leader among "emerging" churches. His sermons are peppered with language not often heard in churches, and he attracts a young, stylish crowd. Culturally hip, but theologically conservative, Driscoll is the author of Confessions of a Reformission Rev. Christianity Today news intern Jason Bailey had a conversation with Driscoll via e-mail.

How will your book, Confessions of a Reformission Rev, help other ministries?


My hope is that it will point to Jesus and help others see that without Jesus as our senior pastor, we are doomed to fail. Confessions of a Reformission Rev is about how God took a broken Bible study with a dozen young people in America's least churched city—where there are more dogs than evangelicals—and grew it to 5,000 people. In less than 10 years, Mars Hill has helped influence 100 church plants around the nation and gone to number one on iTunes for religion/spirituality. Jesus has been good to me and our church. I am also honest about the pain of pastoral ministry—how pastors are sinners too. I hope the book is funny enough to start to put the "fun" back into fundamentalism.

You say there are particular theologies attached to traditional, contemporary, and emerging churches? What are they, and what are Mars Hill's distinctives?


Traditional churches have either leaned toward being fundamentalist and separated from culture, which has led to legalism and irrelevance; or they have leaned toward being liberally synchronized with culture, which leads to compromise and irrelevance. Either way, many traditional churches are irrelevant, ...

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