The Joneses
Our Rating
3 Stars - Good
Average Rating
 
(2 user ratings)ADD YOURSHelp
Mpaa Rating
R (for language, some sexual content, teen drinking and drug use)
Genre
Directed By
Derrick Borte
Run Time
1 hour 36 minutes
Cast
David Duchovny, Demi Moore, Amber Heard, Benjamin Hollingsworth
Theatre Release
April 23, 2010 by Roadside Attractions

A new family has moved into town. They're the embodiment of the American dream: handsome, charming Steve Jones (David Duchovny); his beautiful, fit, friendly wife Kate (Demi Moore); and their two attractive, popular teenagers, Jenn (Amber Heard) and Mick (Ben Hollingsworth). They've taken up residence in an enormous house equipped with the latest amenities, with a couple of nice cars in the driveway. They throw the best parties, serve the best food, play the best golf, and have the most fun.

And naturally, everyone in town wants to, well, keep up with the Joneses.

But the town doesn't realize that they're doing precisely what they're supposed to do. The Joneses aren't who they appear to be. In fact, they're not even related to one another. They're a group of salespeople hired by a company to advertise their clients' high-end products—to make the people around them want what they have. They're selling a lifestyle, not a product. And the town is falling for it.

Is it a deceptive life? It's hard to tell. After all, they are actually living this life—playing the golf, driving the cars, throwing the parties. The "family" life inside the house doesn't quite match the outside appearance, but on the other hand, whose does? However, not everyone takes to this type of double life very well, and that mental toll threatens to take down the "family" entirely.

It's a fantastically inventive plot concept, but one that could have easily gone gimmicky, played solely for laughs and groans. Thankfully, in the hands of first-time writer/director Derrick Borte, the story is subtle, believable, even disturbing. What's most alarming is its familiarity—the unbridled but genteel materialism, the fragmented and alienated relationships, ...

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