What Egyptian Christians Think About Their New Islamist President
Image: Photo by Gettty Images
What Egyptian Christians Think About Their New Islamist President

In the most democratic elections since 1952, the people of Egypt have freely chosen their leader. And for the first time in history, that leader is a native-born Islamist.

Mohamed Morsy of the Muslim Brotherhood captured 51 percent of the vote, narrowly defeating his rival Ahmed Shafik (widely perceived as the candidate of the former regime) who gathered 48 percent. Jubilant crowds in Tahrir Square celebrated into the night, though for diverse reasons.

Many rejoiced at the triumph of the candidate of Islam, one who had pledged to implement Shari'ah law. Others, nervous at the prospect of Muslim Brotherhood rule, nevertheless exulted in the triumph of the revolution, first deposing Mubarak and then defeating his former minister.

Some, though not likely in Tahrir, quietly exhaled at a democratic election and rotation of power, hopeful these gains will not be reversed.

Meanwhile, at a Christian retreat center outside of Cairo, a number of Coptic women shed tears of despair over their community's future, as they huddled around a television and watched Morsy be proclaimed the winner.

Some of the men tried to find the positive. "At least now they [the Islamists] will not burn the country," said Girgis. "It's okay, it's okay. God is present," said Maged as he stood up and left the room slowly. One of the women shut off the TV dejectedly. Some exchanged faint smiles of expectation, wondering what the next four years would hold.

The days between the election and the delayed announcement of the result filled all Egyptians with anxiety. Rumors swelled that if Shafik won, it would only be by fraud. Many imagined Islamists would at the least paralyze Egypt with demonstrations, and at the worst launch a Syria-style civil war. Other rumors outlined ...

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What Egyptian Christians Think About Their New Islamist President
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