Jump directly to the content

Death and Texas - Part 2

Reuters turns a prolife word on its head.

The Reuters story referenced in my last post contained a wild misuse of a common word. Here's the citation:

While the prolific death chamber in the city of Huntsville, where 19 inmates have already been executed by lethal injection in 2007, makes Texas stand out, the state is also starting to follow national trends toward fewer death sentences.

"Prolific death chamber"? "Prolfiic" comes from a Latin word meaning "fruitful," which in turn is based on the Latin word for "offspring." The American Heritage Dictionary offers two definitions for the word:

1. Producing offspring or fruit in great abundance; fertile.

2. Producing abundant works or results: a prolific artist.

The Reuters writer has stood a pro-life word on its head, exchanging the idea of fruitfulness and fertility for sheer efficiency. Christian media critics have often criticized Reuters for uninformed handling of the religion factor in their reporting. But whatever they know or don't know about religion, Reuters editors should know their dictionaries.

Related Topics:Crime; Life Ethics; Politics
Posted:August 13, 2007 at 10:01AM
Gleanings aggregates what others are reporting. Learn more.
Recent Posts
Can Wheaton College Require ROTC Program Be Run By Christians?
US Army reviews nationwide policy for ROTC profs, who are paid by military but work as full-time faculty.
Died: R. Judson Carlberg, Christian Higher Ed Leader, Biologos Chair
On Thanksgiving, he once wrote, 'I am thankful for cancer. James 1:2-3... Life is richer, trust is stronger and relationships are deeper.'
Politics
President Obama Cites Exodus on Immigration Reform: 'We Were Strangers Once Too'
(UPDATED) Reactions from Sam Rodriguez, Russell Moore, Jenny Yang, Noel Castellanos on Obama's motive vs. method.
Pope Francis Learns What Rick Warren, Russell Moore, N. T. Wright Think about Marriage
(UPDATED) Warren turns Vatican conference into 'revivalist meeting,' while Moore explains why marriage crosses theological boundaries.
Christianity Today
Death and Texas - Part 2