Jump directly to the content

Wisconsin Supreme Court Upholds Homicide Conviction for Faith-Healing Parents

Without legal standards on child neglect, parents who let their 11-year-old daughter die argued that they were denied free exercise of religion.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court has upheld the homicide conviction of a faith-healing couple who let their 11-year-old daughter die from diabetes.

In its 6-1 decision, the court ruled that, "by failing to call for medical assistance when (their daughter Kara) was seriously ill and in a coma-like condition…the parents were creating an unreasonable and substantial risk of Kara's death, were subjectively aware of that risk, and caused her death," according to the majority opinion by Chief Justice Shirley Abrahamson.

The court's decision to uphold a lower court's charge of second-degree reckless homicide comes four years after parents Dale and Leilani Neumann were convicted for their daughter's 2008 death from lack of insulin. The Neumanns argued that the charges violated their exercise of religious freedom protected under the First Amendment.

According to The Associated Press, judge Vincent Howard originally ruled that while the Neumanns were free to believe in faith healing, "'the free exercise of the First Amendment protects religious belief, but not necessarily conduct.'"

The ruling is the latest in a growing number of legal cases dealing with parents who seek faith or prayer healing for their children in lieu of traditional medical treatment. According to the AP, "more than a dozen" states legally protect parents' right to pursue faith healing, but the extent to which this right extends—as, for instance, in the case of a child's death—has not been clearly established in the courts.

In the Neumanns' case, the court's ruling "could create guidelines in an unsettled area of law," The New York Times reported in 2009. The AP also notes that Wisconsin's court has sided with state attorneys, who argued that under the state faith healing law, "parents are immune from child abuse charges but not homicide counts. Once (parents) realize a child could die, their immunity ends."

But previous cases in Massachusetts and Oregon have resulted in conflicting rulings regarding the criminality of reliance on faith healing that results in death. Some courts even have taken convicted parents' other children into state custody to prevent further neglect of medical treatment. CT previously reported on the recent Pennsylvania trial that resulted in a conviction of third-degree murder for Herbert and Catherine Schaible, whose infant son died of bacteria pneumonia and dehydration. The Schaibles had been serving probation for the faith-healing-related death of another young son in 2009.

Related Topics:Courts; Faith Healing; Wisconsin
Posted:July 3, 2013 at 10:35AM
Gleanings aggregates what others are reporting. Learn more.

Leave a Comment

Use your Christianity Today login to leave a comment on this article.
Not part of the community? Subscribe now, or register for a free account.
Login
or
Subscribe
or
Register
Recent Posts
New Poverty-Fighting Alliance Launches
World Relief, Germany-based PartnerAid combine to grow programs, donor base.
Bible Society Takes 'More Accurate and Hopeful' Stance on Scripture Skeptics
(UPDATED) No more 'Bible antagonists,' among many findings in this year's ABS/Barna 'State of the Bible' report.
Popular Pastor Resigns after 'Moral Failure,' But Followers Still Want His Sermons
Calvary Chapel Fort Lauderdale explains why it took down Bob Coy's teachings on marriage.
Crimea Adoptions to Americans Blocked by Russia
(UPDATED) Ukraine has replaced Russia as No. 3 source of U.S. adoptions. But Crimea crisis has Christian alliance preparing evacuation plan for 4,000 orphans.