Africa

Fleeing from Chad, Waiting for Peace

Refugees in Cameroon fill their days with conversation and worship.

Chad, a French colony that gained independence from France in 1960, has never achieved true stability. Rebel groups opposed to the central government — which is widely considered to be corrupt — have long been active in the eastern and northern parts of the country. In May 2006, war broke out in the capital city of N'Djamena itself, but the scope of casualties then was far below what has happened early this month.

Amid fierce fighting between government and rebel forces, who were hoping to topple the regime of President Idriss Deby, tens of thousands of people fled N'Djamena. Many of those refugees have ended up in Madana refugee camp in Kosseri, Cameroon.

According to the United Nations, 37,000 refugees were living in Kosseri by February 9.

World Vision has served in Chad since 1985. Their team in Madana has identified a local church to work through and is preparing for further aid to the Chadian refugees. One of the Christian aid agency's relief experts, Ann Birch, has been photographing ...

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