Africa

Uganda Bill That Proposed Death Penalty for (Some) Gays Expected to Pass

2009 proposal was blamed on American evangelicals; Ugandan Christians dismissed charge as cultural imperialism.

A controversial Ugandan bill that strengthens criminal penalties against homosexuality–and originally, in some cases, invoked the death penalty–will soon be put to a vote and is expected to pass.

The bill, first proposed in 2009, has been widely attributed to the influence of American evangelicals; however, CT has reported how American evangelical leaders condemned the bill but Ugandan Christian leaders dismissed this as cultural imperialism.

According to the Associated Press, the speaker for Uganda's parliament, Rebecca Kadaga, says lawmakers will soon vote on the proposed legislation–and she expects the bill to become law before the end of the year.

The bill, first introduced in 2009 by parliament member David Bahati, would expand penalties for homosexuality to include life imprisonment or, in some cases, the death penalty.

And though many Western gay rights advocates have condemned the bill, Ugandans still "are demanding it," Kadaga told the AP.

CT previously reported how the proposed anti-homosexuality ...

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