Africa

Deported Christians Fight To Be Reunited with Morocco Orphans

Court rules against Village of Hope, reversing orphanage's legal status.

(MSN) Expatriate Christians who ran an orphanage in Morocco until they were deported on charges of proselytism say they will take their fight to be reunited with the children to the nation's supreme court if necessary.

Earlier this month an appellate court delivered a verbal ruling in favor of the Moroccan government, which had deported Village of Hope staff members–many of whom lived with and raised the orphans as "foster" parents–and their birth children in 2010 as part of a larger purge of Christians from the country. The May 7 ruling by the Administrative Court of Rabat stated that Village of Hope has no legal status to file any claims.

But the state's appeal this month came after an October 2012 oral ruling, released in writing in January, stipulating that the association was a legitimate legal entity with the right to seek legal redress of grievances. The May 7 ruling could shatter the group's legal claim to the orphanage, which is operating under state-appointed leadership, and enable ...

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