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Christians Can't Be Too Busy to Love Their Neighbors


Jan 7 2014
Amid immigration reform efforts, taking God’s call to community more seriously and urgently.

So the answer to the uncomfortable question is, yes. We have a responsibility to care for others, to learn their stories and share ours, and have meaningful conversations; in doing so, not only do we overcome fears and clear misunderstandings, we are obedient to God's Great Commandment: to love our neighbor as ourselves.

Elena Foulis teaches at The Ohio State University, loves to read and write book reviews, and is a member of Vineyard Christian Fellowship in Columbus, Ohio.

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Christians Can't Be Too Busy to Love Their Neighbors