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Extroverts and Introverts in the Body of ChristChristopher May / Flickr

Extroverts and Introverts in the Body of Christ


Jan 13 2014
Learning from our obsession with personality types.

Last year, we saw a resurgence in interest in personality types. Headlines and studies declared the benefits of being an extrovert, an introvert, an introvert who acts like an extrovert, or even an ambivert (a healthy mix of both).

We seem to always want to know what it takes to get to the top. Is it the strong, silent type? What about the assertive, outgoing one? Like siblings who are always trying to outdo the other, introverts and extroverts often find themselves at opposite ends of the playing field, each thinking they've got the upper hand.

Secular and church cultures share a fascination with personality types. As a resident assistant at a Christian college, I was asked to complete the Myers-Briggs assessment, used to better understand how the staff led and served those under our care in the dorms. Churches and ministries regularly take advantage of personality tests to better gauge their leaders, staff, and congregants.

I am an extrovert, a social butterfly since I uttered my first word. I have never met a stranger and can strike up a conversation with just about anyone. I love being around people, and I hate being alone. You know how some people get anxious when they walk into a crowded room? I am the complete opposite. Silence and solitude terrifies me.

I'm such an extrovert that this recent list on Buzzfeed really resonated with me. I found myself nodding yes to nearly every caption and GIF. Friends to talk it out? Yes, definitely. No plans on a weekend? Shudder. Bored alone? Nailed it.

I also know and love many introverts. I am one of four siblings, and they're not all extroverts like me. I've learned as I've gotten older that each personality is a beautiful depiction of the handiwork of God. Still, extroverts seem to be coming out on top in today's world, which values expression and initiative. In a Wall Street Journal article last summer, the author suggested that research shows introverts might actually be happier if they acted like extroverts.

But not everyone thinks that way. Susan Cain, author ofQ: The Power of Introverts, affirms the value of introverts from every culture and generation. In her TED Talk on the same topic she explains that while we live in a society that is more accommodating for extroverts (education, the workplace, social expectations), introverts are pretty great, too. They are so great, she says, that it's not just the extroverts who have changed the world. She provides a helpful list of leaders and influencers who were introverts and yet accomplished tremendous things. Did you know that Eleanor Roosevelt and Rosa Parks were introverts? And yet, look at all they accomplished.

Related Topics:Psychology

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