Opinion | Sexuality

What Happens When We See Women Teach the Bible

A figure like Beth Moore shows evangelical women what’s possible.
What Happens When We See Women Teach the Bible
Image: Beth Moore / Passion

Sometimes I wonder how many women in the church have the gift of teaching, but will never use it, or even entertain the possibility of possessing it. When roughly 90 percent of evangelical pastors and 80 percent of evangelical seminarians are men, it can be hard for gifted women to find role models in the church. With such a void, do some women even consider the thought?

As a college student, I was confused about the direction of my call and the place of my gifts. At my church, women mostly occupied administrative positions. Even in my college parachurch organization, we rarely had a woman speak. Given the scarcity of female role models, I wasn’t sure where to turn.

However my life was forever changed when, in my early 20s, I attended the annual Passion conference, a popular worship and teaching gathering founded by pastor Louie Giglio. Beth Moore took the stage, and though I was only vaguely familiar with her at the time, I won't ever forget that moment. When she opened ...

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