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The Adjustment Bureau

A discussion-worthy film about fate and free will that's ultimately a love story.
The Adjustment Bureau
Our Rating
3 Stars - Good
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Mpaa Rating
PG-13 (for brief strong language, some sexuality, and a violent image)
Directed By
George Nolfi
Run Time
1 hour 46 minutes
Cast
Matt Damon, Emily Blunt, Lisa Thoreson, Florence Kastriner
Theatre Release
March 04, 2011 by Universal Pictures

Is the course of your life solely a result of your choice, or are there other, larger forces at work? These are questions theologians and philosophers have been debating for centuries. And these are the questions at the heart of this romantic thriller.

The main life in question here is that of David Norris (Matt Damon), a young New York politician. Just moments before giving an important speech, he meets Elise (Emily Blunt), a free-spirited ballet dancer to whom he's instantly drawn. She inspires him to give a speech that boosts his political career, then she disappears. But, as luck—or perhaps fate—would have it, David runs into her on a bus soon after.

However, when David arrives at work that morning, he sees something he shouldn't—a bunch of guys in suits and fedoras reprogramming the brain of his business partner. They explain that they're part of the Adjustment Bureau, the people who make sure things happen according to The Chairman's plan.

And while they're at it, they inform him he's not supposed to be with Elise either—it'll ruin The Plan for his life and hers. Richardson (John Slattery), the main adjuster, wrestles her number from him and then warns David that if he tells anyone about what he's seen, they'll wipe out his mind.

But David isn't that easily daunted, pursuing his own wishes and plans at the apparent peril of his political career. Throughout, he's alternately hindered and helped by the main agent assigned to his case, Harry (Anthony Mackie), the conflicted adjuster. Both men wrestle with issues of free will and fate and what their role is in both.

We viewers are brought along for the ride, weighing these heavy matters in a world where God is a corporate boss-type who has a personal ...

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