Jump directly to the Content

News&Reporting

Americas

What Young Adults in 100 Countries Think of Religion

Despite age gaps, Pew Research uncovers a few places where the next generation is actually more devout than their parents and grandparents.
|
What Young Adults in 100 Countries Think of Religion
Image: John Moore / Getty Images
By some measures, young adults in Liberia are more faithful than older generations.

Despite concerns about secularization, the world’s population may not be losing its religion quite so fast.

Like in the US, young adults around the globe are generally less devout than their elders, especially in Western Europe and Latin America; however, in other regions, many countries have resisted that trend, welcoming new generations of just-as-eager Christians and Muslim believers, according to a Pew Research Center report released today.

Of the 106 countries in the report, more than half (58 nations) show little or no age gap in religious commitment. In the rest (46 nations), adults under 40 were significantly less likely than their elders to consider religion very important.

Particularly religious countries with higher population growth tend to maintain religious belief and commitment between young and old generations. Pew found that over the past decade these highly religious countries outpaced their less religious counterparts due to high fertility rates and disproportionately ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview
To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.
Already a CT subscriber? for full digital access.
October
Support Our Work

Subscribe to CT for less than $4.25/month

Read These Next

close
hide this
Access The Archives

Member-Only Access

Subscribe to Christianity Today to continue reading this article from CT's digital archives.

Subscribe

Already a subscriber? to continue reading.