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The Friendship Dilemma

Early on I was told it is important for a pastor to keep relational distance from the people he works with. The objectivity needed to make hard decisions must not be compromised. (After all, you can't be friends with your boss!)

I disagree.

I have grown to a conviction that it is not enough simply to hire staff or to build a ministry team, I am committed to growing a community of leaders who serve together on a common mission.

At Mosaic our eldership of five is Japanese, Chinese, Salvadorian, and Mexican American. Our leadership team and support staff are even more ethnically diverse. In age, we range from twenties to fifties (and soon sixties). Our differences could become an easy excuse for becoming, at best, co-laborers. Yet we would miss the amazing gift God has given us of friendships that grow as we serve together.

Friendship is a vital part of New Testament ministry and leadership. In fact, I am convinced that we have been unwittingly shooting ourselves in the heart.

We call God's people ...

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