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How do you help leaders maintain focus and enthusiasm on the vision and values of your church?

Leith Anderson responds in our Ask the Experts discussion.

"This is the final boarding call for Flight 365 to Orlando." The door closes, and the airplane is pushed back from the gate. The pilot is going to Orlando. The copilot is going to Orlando. The flight attendants are going to Orlando. All the passengers are going to Orlando—except the guy in seat 23C. He's going to Havana, and we have a name for him: "Hijacker."

In churches, as on planes, it's always good if everyone envisions the same destination—especially leaders. An elder, deacon, pastor, teacher, or charter member whose first name is "Hijacker" would serve everyone better by getting off the plane before it leaves the gate.

How do we keep church leaders all headed toward the same destination with clear purpose and excitement? It comes down to a very short list of basics.

  1. Clear statement of destination. The plane's destination city is on the e-ticket, boarding pass, TV monitors, gate board, and public announcement system.  Repetition. Redundancy. Saying it over again.
         At Wooddale Church in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, the purpose statement of the church is said so often that most Wooddalers know it by heart: "The purpose of Wooddale Church is to honor God by making more disciples for Jesus Christ." We must know the destination without a doubt if we expect leaders to stay focused.

December
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