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The Old School of Ordinary

An Interview with Michael Horton.
The Old School of Ordinary

We recently spoke with Michael Horton, a man who wears many hats, including radio host, editor-in-chief of Modern Reformation magazine, associate pastor, and author. His most recent book, Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World calls for us to examine what it means to have a faith that can last.

1) Your book seems to address the impulse many young people have in wanting to "do big things for Christ." Some might say this desire is motivated by mission and by love for the gospel. What do you find troubling about it, however?

Every generation fancies itself the most important one to come along, that they’re going to change the world—until the vitality of youth succumbs to nursing homes and the annals of dated trends. Movements are short-term, organized campaigns led largely by youthful zeal, opposed to institutions with regular procedures for maturing and acquiring the sorts of knowledge and skills to be a competent member of the community. It’s ...

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