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How Might the COVID-19 Crisis Reshape our Churches for Good?

We have a unique opportunity to reset, pivot from old patterns, and look afresh at the future.
How Might the COVID-19 Crisis Reshape our Churches for Good?
Image: Source photos: SEAN GLADWELL / getty | Sahil Ghosh / getty

In March 2020, as the American public only began to grasp the growing scope of the global pandemic, we suddenly went into a shutdown. Churches could no longer meet in person; many scrambled to find ways to broadcast their Sunday services online instead. Initially, many of us thought (wishfully, as it turned out) that the shutdown would last a few weeks and we would return to normal. But the shutdown dragged out for months and months. Many churches were unable to meet in person for more than a year.

Pastors began wondering out loud to me if their churches would survive financially. They fretted about their buildings, sitting empty week after week. They were concerned about giving amid sudden job losses and economic downturn. They worried about a drop-off in online service attendance. There was much cause for deep anxiety, and the pandemic’s long-term impact on churches may be felt for years to come.

But I don’t believe that the pandemic is a crisis we simply need to recover from. ...

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