James Kopp guilty of murder
James Kopp, who admitted shooting abortionist Barnett Slepian in 1998 but said he only meant to wound him, was convicted of intentional murder yesterday. He faces a minimum sentence of 15 years at his May 9 sentencing, but is likely to receive 25 years to life.

"There wasn't much suspense about the verdict," his lawyer admitted. He also said Kopp told him to ask his detractors one question: 'What's your plan to save babies?'"

Sadly, it doesn't look like many prolife groups are eager to answer that question. Searching the websites for the National Right to Life Committee, Concerned Women for America, Family Research Council, Focus on the Family, and the American Family Association didn't even turn up a mention of Kopp, even though these organizations usually cover abortion news with depth and speed. Several of the groups have in the past issued general statements against abortion violence, but they're not being proactive in responding to the Kopp verdict.

Abortion advocacy groups, on the other hand, are quick with comment. "It's heartening to know there's one less antiabortion terrorist on the street," Planned Parenthood president Gloria Feldt told The Washington Post. "But I don't think the radical fringe is in disarray. They are just emboldened."

The Democrat and Chronicle of Rochester, N.Y., has some local prolife reaction. "I believe justice was served," said Rescue Rochester director Michael Warren. "Scripture says that the state … wields the ability to issue punishment—not the individual. Unfortunately in our country, abortion is legal."

Brighton Residents Against Violence head Carol Crossed agrees. "James Kopp became like the abortionists he abhorred," she said.

Meanwhile, we're posting our 1993 ...

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