Guest / Limited Access /

Rioting destroys ancient Serbian churches
Last Friday, when Weblog noted a mob's destruction of four churches in Nigeria, one loyal reader asked why it got top billing over the destruction of Serbian Orthodox churches. The answer is simple: At the time, Weblog was simply unaware of the extent of the demolition there.

Apparently Weblog wasn't alone. In a meeting with Patriarch Pavle of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Russian Emergencies Minister Sergei Shoigu noted that the world community has largely ignored last week's violence, which left at least 31 dead and more than 500 wounded. Thirty churches, several dating back to the 14th century, were destroyed by ethnic Albanians. Another 11 were damaged.

"We remember well a wave of indignation over the destruction by Taliban troops in Afghanistan of the stone statue[s] of Buddha, because it was the destruction of cultural heritage," Shoigu said, according to the ITAR-TASS news agency. But there's no outcry over these attacks, though they're just as damaging from religious, cultural, and historical perspectives.

Serbs apparently retaliated by attacking mosques elsewhere, including one from the 17th century.

The BBC has several photos, along with a good backgrounder of the complicated triggers of the attack, and the even more complicated history of conflict between the Albanians and Serbs. There's much more than religion to this story, but it seems clear that churches were deliberately targeted and took the brunt of the attacks.

More articles

Abortion:

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
Subscriber Access Only Reply All
Responses to our March issue via letters, tweets, and Facebook posts.
RecommendedThe CT Interview: Saeed Abedini Answers Abuse Allegations
Subscriber Access Only The CT Interview: Saeed Abedini Answers Abuse Allegations
The formerly jailed Iranian American pastor talks to CT about his marriage, his imprisonment, and his hopes for revival.
TrendingChristians Can Hold Their Bladders and Still Shop at Target
Christians Can Hold Their Bladders and Still Shop at Target
Consider the missional implications before you boycott.
Editor's PickReading Esther in the Shadow of ISIS
Reading Esther in the Shadow of ISIS
A Jewish philosopher’s perspective on how God delivers his people from radical evil.
Christianity Today
Dozens of Churches Destroyed in Kosovo
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

March 2004

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.