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Indian-born apologist notes differences with LDS, Fuller head offers apology
On Sunday night, evangelical apologist Ravi Zacharias gave one of his frequent messages on defending Jesus as the Way, the Truth, and the Life in a culture that rejects truth claims. But the pulpit differed radically from Zacharias's usual lecterns, for it was in the Mormon Tabernacle in Salt Lake City.

Zacharias is actually the last person, Mormon or not, who will speak at the Tabernacle for at least 18 months—the building, which was constructed between 1853 and 1893, is undergoing substantial renovations.

Asked to speak on "Who is the Truth?" Zacharias was not expected to highlight many differences between historic Christian theology and Mormonism, but apparently he did mention them. The Deseret Morning News reports:

He spoke of the "exclusivity and sufficiency of Jesus Christ," noting that he asserted an exclusive truth claim in his declaration as "the Way, the Truth and the Life." While he acknowledged that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints differ in many of their views from historic Christianity, he emphasized much of what they share in reverence for a being both consider the divine Savior of mankind.

The Salt Lake Tribune offers a similar summary, saying Zacharias

acknowledged there are doctrinal differences—including some that are deep—between traditional Christianity and the LDS faith.
His hour-long sermon emphasized aspects of Christian doctrine for which Mormons have a different understanding, such as sin, salvation through the Cross, and the Trinity.
But his overarching message—that Jesus Christ is the answer to the longing in all human hearts—was one that resonated with both evangelical Christians and Mormons … .

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Ravi Zacharias, Rich Mouw Speak in Mormon Tabernacle
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November 2004

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