How ironic that the God-man, who freely gave the living water of eternal life, should face his death thirsty. Christians believe that before the eternal Son of God came to earth to pay the penalty for our sin, he had no needs. He lived in perfect fellowship with the Father and the Holy Spirit. Yet here he was, skewered to a cross, his tongue cleaving to the roof of his mouth.

Jesus was not a spirit trapped in a shell. He was perfect man with an imperfect body, and now, before the Resurrection, his body betrayed him. How like us! Jesus knew firsthand the frustration, the agony of the physical. The writer to the Hebrews says of him, "For we do not have a high priest who is unable to sympathize with our weaknesses." Yes, until the end we will face physical pain, disability, and thirst.

But Jesus knows. More than that, suspended between heaven and earth, he has shown us how we should respond to our thirst as we await our own resurrection. Again, the writer of Hebrews says, "Let us fix our eyes on Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy set before him endured the Cross, scorning its shame, and sat down at the right hand of the throne of God."


Related Elsewhere:

Stan Guthrie is senior associate news editor for Christianity Today. More thoughts are available from his website.

More about the editor of Echoes from Calvary, Richard Young, and his quartet, which recently recorded The Seven Last Words of Christ, is available from the quartet's website.

Echoes From Calvary is available from Amazon.com and other book retailers.

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When the Giver of Eternal Life Thirsts
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