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Abu Sayyaf recruiting Christians:

  • Abu Sayyaf recruiting Christians--military | Al-Qaeda-linked Abu Sayyaf militants have recruited about 100 mostly Christian men from two Mindanao provinces since July, offering them money to help stage attacks, according to a military report. (Philippine Daily Inquirer)
  • Abu Sayyaf now recruiting Christians for future attacks | Christians are being recruited by the Abu Sayyaf for future attacks in key areas in Mindanao, a military intelligence office revealed Wednesday. (The Manila Times)

Northern Ireland:

  • Feud sparks worst N.Irish violence in years-report | A feud between rival Protestant paramilitary groups has sparked the worst violence ever investigated by Northern Ireland's cease-fire watchdog, according to a report published on Thursday. (Reuters)
  • A Catholic town watches quietly as Protestant rancor grows | As the farmer starts to speak, the sudden roar of an aircraft engine cuts him off. A British Army helicopter bursts through the clouds and skims the rooftops of this Catholic town in County Armagh six miles from the border with Ireland. (The Christian Science Monitor)
  • IRA 'moving towards decommission' | The IRA is beginning to make moves related to decommissioning, Northern Ireland's new political development minister has said. (BBC)

War & terrorism:

  • Recent poll shows church-goers supportive of war | As insurgents continue to attack military and civilian targets, the number of American casualties rise and a consensus on a constitution remains elusive, support for the war in Iraq wanes. The president, however, can depend on one group for support: regular churchgoers. (Jeff Adair, Marlborough Enterprise, Mass.)
  • God-fearing Spartans | A look at America's "imperial grunts." … One of the more surprising of Mr. Kaplan's findings is that evangelical Christianity helped to transform the military in the 1980s, rescuing the Vietnam-era Army from drugs, alcohol and alienation. (The Wall Street Journal)
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Weblog
Launched in 1999, Christianity Today’s Weblog was not just one of the first religion-oriented weblogs, but one of the first published by a media organization. (Hence its rather bland title.) Mostly compiled by then-online editor Ted Olsen, Weblog rounded up religion news and opinion pieces from publications around the world. As Christianity Today’s website grew, it launched other blogs. Olsen took on management responsibilities, and the Weblog feature as such was mothballed. But CT’s efforts to round up important news and opinion from around the web continues, especially on our Gleanings feature.
Ted Olsen
Ted Olsen is Christianity Today's managing editor for news and online journalism. He wrote the magazine's Weblog—a collection of news and opinion articles from mainstream news sources around the world—from 1999 to 2006. In 2004, the magazine launched Weblog in Print, which looks for unexpected connections and trends in articles appearing in the mainstream press. The column was later renamed "Tidings" and ran until 2007.
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