Guest / Limited Access /

The road home from war is longer, steeper, and often more challenging than the road to war for most soldiers and their families. After the joyful, long anticipated reunions there is a difficult period of transition, readjustment, and hard work ahead for every soldier and his or her family. The church can be a helpful partner in the process.

Recent studies reviewed in the June 2004 New England Journal of Medicine reveal that as many as 18 percent of returning combat veterans struggle with significant mental health issues upon returning home. Department of Defense medical authorities now state that as many as 30 percent of returning Army Reserve and Guard members struggle with significant mental health issues four to six months after returning from combat. These studies highlight the need for the church to be a partner in the complex readjustment process of returning soldiers and their families.

The first place for the church to start in becoming a helpful partner in the readjustment process is to gain an understanding of what the soldier and his family face when they reunite. Both parties have been through odysseys of their own. Both have been stretched, challenged, overwhelmed, and pushed to the limits of their endurance.

The families have learned to fill the void left by the soldiers. New roles have been assumed and sometimes mastered. New rules have taken effect. Money has been managed by the family without the soldier's direct input. New skills have been gained, experiences had, and friendships made. The soldier is returning to the same family but a newer model. The soldier's role in the family may have changed, and the family may not even be aware of it.

The soldier is returning from a life of danger to a life of uncertainty. ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedHow Christians Can Flourish in a Same-Sex-Marriage World
Subscriber Access Only How Christians Can Flourish in a Same-Sex-Marriage World
By many accounts, orthodox Christians have lost the culture wars. How they can live well—not vanish—in a time of retreat.
TrendingHow 1,000 Women Who Aborted Feel About the Local Church
How 1,000 Women Who Aborted Feel About the Local Church
Survey: Two in three evangelicals were attending monthly or more at the time of their first abortion.
Editor's PickThe Colonists’ New Religious Mystery
The Colonists’ New Religious Mystery
Sorry, Pilgrims: Jamestown’s spiritual life is suddenly much more fascinating.
Christianity Today
Veteran Ministry
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

June 2006

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.