Guest / Limited Access /

Republican strategists proudly announced in 2004 that America had morphed into a conservative nation. What a difference two halting years in Iraq and one massive hurricane have made in severely undermining Republican gains.

Due to perceived missteps at home and abroad, Republicans face the very real prospect of losing both the Senate and the House of Representatives, which they raucously claimed in 1994.

Nevertheless, white evangelicals' support for Republican candidates remains high. But maybe not high enough to staunch Republican losses. October polling from the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press indicates 60 percent of these evangelicals plan to vote for Republican candidates. Just one month earlier, 64 percent said they would back Republicans. Contributing to the decline is the lack of a galvanizing candidate and social issue, such as President Bush and gay marriage in 2004.

"The sense of urgency for a lot of people who care about traditional marriage probably isn't there as much as it was two years ago," Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., told CT. "Recent court decisions have been more favorable toward traditional marriage."

Christianity Today has identified four key races to follow on Election Night. These contests feature debates about issues of special concern to evangelicals.

"These are races where evangelicals really could make the difference, no matter how they vote," said John Green, senior fellow with the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

State Treasurer Bob Casey Jr. (D) vs. Sen. Rick Santorum (R)

If Democrats take the Senate, look no further than Pennsylvania. This is the race Democrats have circled since the bitter 2004 campaign. Sen. Rick Santorum is an inviting target. The Senate's third-ranking Republican, ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedBiblical Illiteracy by the Numbers Part 1: The Challenge
Biblical Illiteracy by the Numbers Part 1: The Challenge
How well do American Christians know their Bibles? Hint: not well.
TrendingMark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
Mark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
"I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission."
Editor's PickA Word Can Be Worth a Thousand Pictures
A Word Can Be Worth a Thousand Pictures
Why the pulpit—and not the screen—still belongs at the center of our churches.
Comments
Christianity Today
Margin of Victory
hide thisNovember November

In the Magazine

November 2006

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.