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The author of a new book, Dangerous Surrender, Warren is executive director of the HIV/AIDS Initiative at Saddleback Church, where her husband, Rick, is senior pastor.

It tells the story of how she was transformed from a living a comfortable middle-class life as a pastor's wife and mother to becoming active in the church's global response to the HIV/AIDS pandemic.

From Nov. 28-30, Saddleback Church will host its third global summit on HIV/AIDS on its main campus in Lake Forest in Orange County, California, followed by the Dec. 1 Youth Summit on World AIDS Day. A shortened version of this interview appeared in the November issue.

Each year, the HIV and AIDS pandemic worsens, despite the many billion of dollars being spent. What are we doing wrong?

We're not including the church. We won't ever be able to stop AIDS without the involvement of local churches. The government can try its hardest. They spend billions of dollars. And philanthropists are spending millions and millions of dollars. There's a lot of money being spent—finally. But without the faith community, I just don't think it will get accomplished.

What does the local church have to offer in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS?

The church has a distribution network already in place. I can attend these conferences and sit, and they'll say, "What about orphans? There's millions and millions of orphans. What can we do about all of the orphans?" I'm in the back of the room raising my hand going, "The church. The church."

The church has to care and can take care of orphans. The church can be a distribution center for medication and for helping people having peer counseling who can help people remember to take their medication. It sounds so simple, but that one act alone, ...

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Christianity Today
Q&A: Kay Warren
hide thisNovember November

In the Magazine

November 2007

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