Guest / Limited Access /
My Top 5 Books On Special Needs
My Top 5 Books On Special Needs

Reinders uses a Trinitarian lens to push readers to consider whether friendship—a voluntary and mutually self-giving relationship—is possible with individuals with profound disabilities.

The Bible, Disability, and the Church: A New Vision of the People of God
Amos Yong (Eerdmans)

Using specific scriptural texts, Yong exhorts the church to re-imagine the body of Christ as a body that not only includes people with disabilities but also understands these people as central to the church's mission.

The Violent Bear It Away: A Novel
Flannery O'Connor (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

In this haunting novel, O'Connor considers the spiritual implications of a child with a mental disability. The child's presence forces individuals around him to believe in or reject God.

Living Gently in a Violent World: The Prophetic Witness of Weakness
Stanley Hauerwas and Jean Vanier (InterVarsity)

Everything Hauerwas and Vanier have written about disability deserves inclusion in this list, but this slim volume of the two in conversation introduces readers to theology and ethics surrounding disability in the context of the L'Arche communities.

Dancing with Max: A Mother and Son Who Broke Free
Emily Colson (Zondervan)

This memoir, about Colson's son Max, who has autism, offers a mother's insight into family, the church, and disability. Through it, we come to understand what Colson means when she says that Max, autism and all, is a gift.

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

From Issue:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
RecommendedHow to Talk to Parents of Children With Down Syndrome
How to Talk to Parents of Children With Down Syndrome
I am much more inclined to tell the whole truth when you assume she is someone to celebrate.
TrendingMark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
Mark Driscoll Resigns from Mars Hill
"I do not want to be the source of anything that might detract from our church’s mission."
Editor's PickA Word Can Be Worth a Thousand Pictures
A Word Can Be Worth a Thousand Pictures
Why the pulpit—and not the screen—still belongs at the center of our churches.
Comments
Christianity Today
My Top 5 Books On Special Needs
hide thisJuly/August July/August

In the Magazine

July/August 2012

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.