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Why Churches Worship Illegally—In Paris
Image: Kenzo Tribouillard / AFP / Getty
Why Churches Worship Illegally—In Paris

As more than 100 Haitian evangelicals danced and sang on Easter Sunday, the floor caved in at their makeshift church north of Paris. The deaths of a 6-year-old girl and 47-year-old woman who fell through the second story of the rented house in Stains were a tragic sign that Christian gatherings have outgrown available space in the secular French capital.

"Many immigrants that come from French islands and territories are fervent in their religious expression," said Gilbert Bilezikian, a pastor and former Wheaton College professor born and educated in France. "[They] cannot gather without making a lot of noise, so it is difficult to find places to meet."

Of the nation's 1.6 million Protestants, 460,000 now identify as evangelicals amid heavy immigration from Francophone nations. Last year, their churches nearly tripled from 769 to 2,068, according to the French National Council of Evangelical Churches (CNEF).

However, cash-strapped congregations—immigrant or otherwise—are having difficulty finding worship space that meets safety standards.

"Space is a very hard thing to find over here, and is very expensive," said Lorenzo Monge, founder and lead pastor of the Église de la Brie, a young church just east of Paris.

Thus many churches "outlaw themselves" by illegally worshiping in unsafe buildings, says Christian Willi, publisher of French magazine Christianity Today (unrelated to CT). "This [trend] is a real problem."

...

Meanwhile, many historic chapels with soaring steeples and gothic architecture are being demolished for lack of attendance amid rising upkeep and restoration costs.

Some historic churches rent their space. But the available ...

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Why Churches Worship Illegally—In Paris
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October 2012

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