Guest / Limited Access /
Reviews

/

Religious Freedom Is Not a Zero-Sum Game
Persecuted: The Global Assault on Christians
Our Rating
3½ Stars - Good
Book Title
Persecuted: The Global Assault on Christians
Author
Publisher
Thomas Nelson
Release Date
March 11, 2013
Pages
416
Price
$12.37
Buy Persecuted: The Global Assault on Christians from Amazon

Paul Marshall, Lela Gilbert, and Nina Shea have long experience in drawing attention to the widespread and increasing hostility that religious believers face across the globe. Between them, they have now written so many books, given so many talks, and appeared on so many radio and television shows that their newest contribution, Persecuted: The Global Assault on Christians (Thomas Nelson) isn't just an isolated argument. It's a part of a movement.

The book focuses on Christians—and rightly so, they argue, because Christians are, by some estimates, the target of as many as 75 percent of the acts of religious persecution worldwide. But this is not an isolated argument. Nor do the authors make the mistake of imagining Christians are the only victims. In fact, their deliberate appeal to American Christians on behalf of Christians is every bit a strategy for combating persecution in general. Religious freedom is not a zero-sum game.

Part of the problem they are addressing is the persistent myth that Christianity is an essentially Western, or American, thing. But there are more Christians going to worship every week in China than there are in all of Western Europe. Slowly, painstakingly, we are awakening to the realization that Christianity is not, essentially, a Western thing (if it ever really was). If your game is Christianity, the action isn't in America. It's not even in North America.

The average Christian on the planet is likely a Brazilian or Nigerian woman or a Chinese youth. And nowadays, given where most of the world's Christians are, being a Christian, or becoming one, can be a very, very bad choice if peace and security are your goals. In an ironic inversion, the religion of colonialist ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

Browse All Book Reviews By:
Read These NextSee Our Latest
Current Issue5 Books to Read During an Internet Sabbatical
Subscriber Access Only 5 Books to Read During an Internet Sabbatical
Considering a break from the web? Let Esther Emery pick the right readings to keep you company.
RecommendedGlobal Evangelical Leaders: Trump’s Win Will Harm the Church’s Witness
Global Evangelical Leaders: Trump’s Win Will Harm the Church’s Witness
Conference call explores election consequences on evangelicals overseas.
TrendingWhy Do We Have Christmas Trees?
Why Do We Have Christmas Trees?
The history behind evergreens, ornaments, and holiday gift giving.
Editor's PickFairness for All: Evangelicals Explore Truce on LGBT and Religious Rights
Fairness for All: Evangelicals Explore Truce on LGBT and Religious Rights
It worked in Utah. But national effort by the CCCU and NAE will be more complicated.
Christianity Today
Religious Freedom Is Not a Zero-Sum Game
hide thisAccess The Archives

In the Archives

April 2013

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.