The Second Calling of a Christian Burnout
Image: Courtesy of Carolyn Weber

Carolyn Weber had just endured a turbulent season of life. Everything that had governed her daily activities was turned upside down. She was taking a sabbatical from her job as an English professor; her young daughter and even younger twins were demanding every spare moment; her colleagues in the academy told her that her recently-published spiritual memoir (Surprised by Oxford) was "career suicide." In her latest memoir, Holy Is the Day: Living in the Gift of the Present, Weber reflects on how she emerged from that traumatic period with a deeper trust in God, rooted in a renewed appreciation for the ordinary things of life. "We are all punctuating steps in the dance of the story," she writes, "we are all readers of our skies, learning from burnout, growing in relationship with God and with each other, seeking and being open to the holy in the dailiness of things." Writer Laura Turner spoke with Weber about finding the holy in the mundane.

Why was this the book you chose to write after Surprised by Oxford?

A book sometimes comes and taps you on the shoulder and asks to be written. This book kept tapping. Prior to Surprised, I had always been an academic writer, devoted to what I was researching. Surprised by Oxford was a genre leap, and it opened up for me how I wanted to do more faith-based writing.

I resisted it at first. I had my own version of the Jonah dilemma, wanting to run back to what I knew, the research and the writing. I had other projects on my mind, but God kept tugging on my heart. My editor at InterVarsity Press told me to "write the book that begs to be written," and that gave me permission to listen to what I was being called to write as a form of trusting.

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Holy Is the Day: Living in the Gift of the Present
Holy Is the Day: Living in the Gift of the Present
IVP Books
2013-09-26
192 pp., $10.70
Buy Holy Is the Day: Living in the Gift of the Present from Amazon
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The Second Calling of a Christian Burnout
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