Not So Common Prayer—to a Not So Common God
Image: Ed Yourdon / Flickr

Imagine a person who for years and years has grabbed coffee and a bagel each morning and then fasted till the next day, taking only sips of water, juice, or soda maybe, grabbing a cracker or a pretzel when her busy life made that a thing that she could easily do. And then imagine one day she hears of this new approach to nourishment. Something called meals. Three times a day. Cereal with milk and coffee in the morning; entire sandwiches at lunchtime; meat, pasta, salad, and crusty bread for dinner; and at bedtime, a piece of apple pie like you haven’t tasted since you were a child. That comparison comes closest to describing the change in my life once I started praying for 15 minutes 4 times a day. It gave a whole new meaning to the instruction to “taste and see how good the Lord is” (Ps. 34:8).

I might have expected that when I began this new discipline it would be like pulling teeth—that difficult and painful. But prayer is what we were made for; prayer is a spiritual connection with the living God. It is not an ordinary experience. Once I had completed the daunting task of upending my life to take on this new challenge, I found that it was like coming home to a place I had only dreamed about. We are creatures designed by God to operate in a certain way. When we are in harmony with our design, we function well, and when we are out of harmony with our design, we don’t. A whale stranded on a beach flops about. Ah, but see him in the water and he is the magnificent creature God made him to be. And when we are in communion with our Lord in prayer, we are something to behold—something God beholds with pleasure.

Don’t get me wrong. I am not saying that the change from snatching snacks ...

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Not So Common Prayer—to a Not So Common God
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