Raising a Generation of Peacemakers, Part One

Following Jesus may put us in harm's way. But we should never be alone in that endeavor. A guest post from Russell Jeung.
Raising a Generation of Peacemakers, Part One
Image: Bob Mical/Flickr

From Peter: There are some who study cross cultural ministry academically, some who live it out practically, and still others who do both. Dr. Russell Jeung, professor at San Francisco State University, is definitely one who does both! I'm excited to have him on the blog, sharing his experiences on raising his family and following Jesus in the Murder Dubs neighborhood of Oakland.

Over a year ago, when our church was holding a meeting, our youth director was tragically killed just outside in a hit-and-run accident; the driver was high on crystal meth. Even today, I am traumatized.

I don’t get flashbacks, but flash-forwards. Whenever I watch my own kids or our church kids cross the street, I foresee them getting hit by a reckless driver. Each time, I need to stop to take a calming breath.

My wife, Joan, and I have been raising our son and two foster daughters in an Oakland neighborhood that the youth call the Murder Dubs. The most robbed neighborhood in the robbery capital of the United States, it clearly isn’t a safe place for anyone. Nonetheless, we have lived here for over 20 years. Along with our church family, New Hope Covenant, we want our families to receive God’s peace. To do so, we seek the welfare of our city.

You may not live in a poor neighborhood, but you might be like us in being helicopter parents, hovering over your children because of your love and concern for them. How can we raise our children in a safe and secure environment while also teaching them to follow Jesus in the radical ways he presented in the Beatitudes?

At New Hope, we have developed some community practices to support families.

Blessed Are the Poor in Spirit and Being the Church

The first practice of our ...

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Third Culture
Third Culture looks at matters of faith from the multicultural and minority perspective.
Peter Chin
Peter W. Chin is the pastor of Rainier Avenue Church and author of Blindsided By God. His advocacy work for racial reconciliation has been featured on CBS Sunday Morning, NPR, and the Washington Post.
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Raising a Generation of Peacemakers, Part One
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