Equity
Image: Sony Pictures Classics
Anna Gunn in 'Equity'

Last January, I was in a room full of movie lovers who were discussing the movies they'd seen the previous day at the Sundance Film Festival, and one of them had seen Equity. He recounted how he'd liked the movie, but had been thrown off by the mostly-female cast, finding himself wondering why most of the main characters were women: the high-powered investment banker, her ambitious VP, the lawyer investigating them, the hacker.

I wondered, why did they have to be women? he said. And then I thought: oh, this is how women feel watching these movies.

Sarah Megan Thomas and Anna Gunn in 'Equity'
Image: Sony Pictures Classics

Sarah Megan Thomas and Anna Gunn in 'Equity'

Indeed. In Equity, investment banker Naomi Bishop (Anna Gunn) specializes in taking companies public, but her last IPO tanked after the owner complained that she “rubbed them the wrong way.” Now she's vying to land another: a security-conscious social networking company whom she helped find their initial venture capital investors. She and her VP Erin Manning (Sarah Megan Thomas) land the deal and start lining up investors.

Meanwhile, at a networking event, Naomi bumps into her old friend Samantha (Alysia Reiner), a lawyer who investigates securities fraud. But maybe the happenstance meeting wasn't accidental; Naomi's ongoing liaison with her colleague Michael Connor (James Purefoy) is cause for suspicion.

Equity is an intelligent film for smart people, or at least those who aren’t afraid of some finance wonk talk and terms like “end-to-end encryption.” Instead of succumbing to the trope-y sleek glamour of many of its Wall Street predecessors, the movie gets that finance is a grueling matter conducted largely by tired, determined people under fluorescent lights who mostly just like the adrenaline and satisfaction of the work. And the paycheck doesn’t hurt.

It is hard to parse exactly what to say about the politics of a film like Equity, which obviously has gender on its mind. On the one hand, just recounting the plot without gendered pronouns is a bit like that old riddle in which a man and his son are in car crash, and while the man dies at the scene, the son is rushed to the hospital, where the surgeon declares, “I can't operate on this boy—he's my son!” It's only a riddle in a world in which the default gender of a surgeon is male, which is hardly the case any more (try out the riddle on your local Millennial and see what happens).

Anna Gunn and Lee Tergesen in 'Equity'
Image: Sony Pictures Classics

Anna Gunn and Lee Tergesen in 'Equity'

Similarly, Equity's strongest statements about women's abilities (and disadvantages) in the workplace come from the ways it shows the viewer, instead of just telling them, that it can be tough to be a professional woman, but that it's also possible. It's obviously taking its cues from cultural discussions of the sort found in Anne-Marie Slaughter's 2012 Atlantic article “Why Women Still Can't Have It All,” which even makes an appearance on a character's Blackberry (Sheryl Sandberg is nowhere to be seen, which is surprising until you realize the film is set in 2012).

And the film does pull this off in myriad ways, quietly raising issues around pregnancy and motherhood, sexual harassment, and the challenges of being taken seriously through plot. Ethical complexities mostly surface in characters’ facial expressions, not their conversations. The film’s glass ceiling is felt, more than talked about. That's far more effective than having characters deliver monologues about those same topics. And while most of the bad guys are male, that’s realistic: most of Wall Street (and Silicon Valley, for that matte) is male, and it’s no stretch, given how fraud tends to blossom in the testosterone-fueled macho culture of high finance. (Wolf of Wall Street, many Wall Street people will tell you, is perhaps too measured in its depiction of that world.)

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