The Fight for Social Justice Starts Within
Image: Dante Terzigni

A little over a decade ago, no emblem of young Christians’ blooming justice activism flashed brighter than Invisible Children. It was born in 2004, shortly after Jason Russell and two other recent college graduates returned to the United States from Uganda with burning hearts and miles of amateur film footage.

The trio produced a shoestring documentary baring the pain of Uganda’s civil war. Within three years, tens of thousands of activists were participating in the group’s “night commutes” to raise awareness of Uganda’s child soldiers. In 2012, Invisible Children launched another video, Kony 2012, which struck hard at warlord Joseph Kony and pressed for stronger government efforts to capture him. Time magazine declared it the most viral video in history, garnering 100 million views in the first week after release.

But the stunning rise was short-lived. In Uganda, Kony proved tenacious. In the United States, stress and the glare of the public eye sent co-founder Russell into a tailspin. Ten days after the video’s release, another video went viral—this one of Russell’s public mental breakdown on the streets of San Diego. In December 2014, BuzzFeed announced “The End Of Invisible Children.” The pronouncement was premature—the organization is still active today—but many advocates parted ways.

Looking back on the battle that he and millions of supporters had waged against a single African war criminal, Russell concluded bluntly, “I feel like Kony won.”

An All-Too-Common Story

Russell’s story is dramatic, but he is hardly alone. His is merely the amplified tale of countless other advocates, activists, social workers, and nonprofit founders. ...

Subscriber access only You have reached the end of this Article Preview

To continue reading, subscribe now. Subscribers have full digital access.

July/August
Subscribe to CT and get one year free.
Christianity Today
The Fight for Social Justice Starts Within
hide thisJuly/August July/August

In the Magazine

July/August 2017

To continue reading, subscribe now for full print and digital access.