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Immigration

From its early days as a band of Puritan exiles to its contemporary role as a champion of social justice issues, the evangelical movement has long been concerned with the plight of the outsider. Nearly two million people enter the United States every year, many of them illegally, with an annual waiting list of over 15 million. Growing numbers of international refugees, a sprawling Mexican border, and the proliferation of drugs and terrorism lend urgency to the situation. With the 2010 enactment of Arizona’s anti-illegal immigration Senate Bill 1070, parties on all sides began calling for reform at the national level, leaving evangelicals—particularly the burgeoning Hispanic church—torn between the extension of grace and the execution of justice.

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  • Evangelicals address migrant crisis
    A band of influential religious leaders is urging lawmakers not to make any changes to a 2008 anti-trafficking law that was originally meant to protect migrant children but has now become a flashpoint in the crisis of unaccompanied minors at the border. (POLITICO)
  • Project Pedro Pan and Today’s Manufactured Border Crisis
    When Fidel Castro brought the horrors of Communism to the island nation of Cuba, parents feared their children would lose their faith, their heritage and suffer indoctrination. Some parents did the unthinkable: They sent their children away, not knowing if they’d be reunited.

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