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Laughing at the Sexual Abuse of Boys?

A new movie suggests that boys want to be sexually exploited by adult women. Really?

In recent days, I have twice seen a television trailer for That's My Boy, a new movie featuring the dubious pairing of Adam Sandler and Andy Samberg, both of Saturday Night Live fame. Embedded in the storyline is the premise that Sandler's character was seduced by his teacher as a young teenager. The result was a pregnancy—followed by high-fives for the 13-year-old father in the courtroom during the teacher's trial—and the birth of their child, played by Samberg. The father, whom Samberg's character calls "basically the worst parent ever," tries to reconnect with his son when he needs money.

I don't anticipate much redeeming value in this movie, and I don't plan to see it. But the trailer caught my attention because of its casual suggestion that the sexual abuse of boys is funny.

Such a depiction of sexual contact between adult women and boys is not unusual. As one recent story points out, myths and stereotypes frequently distort our view of boys who are sexually abused by adult ...

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