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Boobs on the Boob Tube
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Boobs on the Boob Tube


Sep 3 2013
Television done right can promote a fuller view of our bodies.

As a mother, naturally, this concerns me.

But here's the thing: I'm concerned beyond merely the sexual aging and even behavior of my kids. I'm concerned with the very ideas about the body that they're growing up with and about the skewed ideas "the media" often communicates about what the body is for.

I'm concerned that in this sex-saturated and sex-glorifying society my kids are being reshaped—warped—by this idea that attracting others and being "sexy" is the best thing our bodies can offer and that they won't understand the full amazingness of our bodies.

I realize the "easy" answer to this is to shut off the TV and disconnect the WiFi. But it's not an honest one. I can't—and won't—fully block out the media's influence on my kids. Which is not to say I can't try or that I can't join with Seitz in her outrage over what's being shown on TV.

Since TV—and outside media—is and will be a part of my family's life, I want to celebrate instances when it provides these fuller images of the amazing bodies God gave us. When it uses its power over our minds for the good.

Like when we see a woman breastfeeding on a commercial or friends hugging in a hallway, and we understand that bodies are meant to bond and nourish.

Like when we see athletes vaulting or running or diving or grunting as they whop a ball across a court and understand that bodies are meant to be pushed and to strong.

Like when we see dancers leap and twirl and bend and flow and understand that bodies can create art, express emotion and desire and pain.

Or like, for instance, when SpongeBob breaks his butt again and is threatened with the "iron butt" were see that bodies are breakable and sometimes (well, butts always) really funny.

While this fuller understanding of the body obviously has benefits for my kids' physical and mental wellbeing, it also has spiritual benefits. After all, they are being raised not only with bodies but they are being raised in the body. The Body of Christ, that is. And the better grasp they have of the fullness and diverseness of their bodies and what each part is made for and capable of, well, the better they understand it in the church and among other Christians.

So, when TV can step in and show us this—and combat some of its own over-emphasis on sex—well, hurrah for them. And every body.

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